Kolbe's folding windows bring the sights and sounds of Wausau's historic downtown to patrons

Source:  www.kolbewindows.com

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Thanks to a storefront update using Kolbe's Ultra Series folding windows, the restaurant guests now truly have a grand view.

After serving as home to the area's courthouses for over a century and a mixed-use property for another half-century, Wausau's historic Courthouse Square was cleared in 2002 to become a green space and gathering space for community events.

The newly purposed square positively transformed the views and street life of the historic buildings surrounding it, including the 1929 Mayer-Lotz building in the Chicago Commercial style.

The owners of this building, Kurt Kraimer and Ed Kraimer of GK 408 3rd St. LLC, saw an opportunity to foster a greater connection to the activity of the square and draw more patrons inside Malarkey's Pub and Townies Grill.

Given its proximity to the theater, the old Mayer-Lotz building is often called "Grand View" by Wausau's residents. Thanks to a storefront update using Kolbe's Ultra Series folding windows, the restaurant guests now truly have a grand view.

"Everyone wants to sit by the windows. It's the #1 question asked at our hostess station," says Tyler Vogt, co-owner of Malarkey's. "The windows definitely give our place a more modern, big city feel with a connection to the activities Downtown." "It creates a very unique atmosphere, something we have been working on for a long time and it turned out fantastic," praises Kurt Kraimer.

"We didn't want it to look out of touch or out of time with the other historic buildings. Kolbe made sure it looked correct, while meeting the City's requirements."

When Malarkey's opened its restaurant in 2007, it occupied what previously had been two separate, but connected locations. The building had been divided and built-out in the 1960s for various retail businesses, offices and restaurants. "There was a disjointed look to the existing storefront. It had been updated many decades ago using large, single-pane glass. It offered a mostly unobstructed view, but it was old and the seals had deteriorated," remembers Vogt.

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